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View Full Version : The future is bright, if...



HOOTER
03-22-2008, 11:05 AM
The future of Gonzaga basketball will certainly be bright as long as a couple things happen. First, the players need to learn to adapt and assimilate into Few's system. I'm not sure if everyone fully bought into the direction Coach Few was trying to take the team this season. Second, Few needs to adapt his coaching style to the new type of player he's recruiting now. Sometimes I wonder if he thought that recruiting more talented players would automatically elevate the program. It's harder to get highly talented players that were stars in high school to fit into their proper roles than it is to take halfway decent players and mold and shape them into the type of players you want them to be, but if your able to pull it off you'll have a potential final four team as a result. The program is at a crossroads right now and if the coaches and players are willing to cooperate and humble themselves a little, which I have little doubt they will, the future of this program will be brighter than ever.

MedZag
03-22-2008, 11:20 AM
Second, Few needs to adapt his coaching style to the new type of player he's recruiting now. Sometimes I wonder if he thought that recruiting more talented players would automatically elevate the program. It's harder to get highly talented players that were stars in high school to fit into their proper roles than it is to take halfway decent players and mold and shape them into the type of players you want them to be, but if your able to pull it off you'll have a potential final four team as a result.

People seem awfully worried about this, but (and I posted this in another thread), I think it all started with Pargo, and Few's handling of P can be a blueprint for the future.

Jeremy came in as a totally different breed of point guard from the zag teams of the past - big. strong. quick. athletic. I remember slapping my forehead countless times from Jeremy's decision making freshman year, as he continued to drive recklessly into the lane and lob errant court long passes on the break, things he could get away with in high school but that obviously and painfully didn't fly at the D1 level.

Look at where Jeremy is two years later. He has become a highly intelligent player who assembled the highest assist-to-turnover ratio in the WCC. He's become our team leader. But he's also maintained the skills that made him such a unique player, perfecting his moves in the lane and maintaining that "wow" athleticism that can change the momentum of a game.

Freshman year, Few kept Pargo on a very short leash (partly because he had the luxury of Raivio and Knight ahead of him). He yanked him after mistakes. Pargo's minutes were as sporadic as his decision making. But Few has come to an understanding with Pargo. As long as Pargo kept working on cutting down on his mistakes and kept playing with intensity, Few gave him more leniency to do some of the unconventional things that he brought to the table. The alley oop passes. The long passes on the break. It's become a 2-way street.

I see the same sort of treatment with Austin by Few this year. Austin has unique skills we've never seen at GU before. But he's also continued the habit of attempting things that may have flown in high school but don't fly at the D1 level. Ill advised shots, taking his man when the defense doesn't permit it, lapses on defense. So Few kept him on a short leash, much like Pargo. Partly because he had individuals like Pendo and Kuso to play ahead of him. Austin will learn to fit into the system better, but Few WILL learn to loosen Daye's leash as long as Daye demonstrates the continued work ethic towards polishing his game and playing hard.